Navigation
Home Page

Art & Design

Arboretum Yearly Overview (2014 Curriculum)

Art & Design

 

Art, craft and design embody some of the highest forms of human creativity. A high-quality art and design education should engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.

 

Art at Arboretum promotes art, craft and design which engages, inspires and challenges children. They are given the opportunity to develop their skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As children progress they are given the opportunity to review and analyse their work using the language of art, craft and design techniques. Meaningful and purposeful cross-curricular links are made with Art and Design, Maths and Science to support children’s breadth and depth of understanding, so children communicate their learning in a range of forms.

Art objectives and outcomes, like all subjects, form part of meaningful and relevant learning journeys. Teaching the statutory knowledge, skills and understanding of Art results in Arboretum children being equipped with:

Aims

  • The national curriculum for art and design aims to ensure that all pupils:
  • produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.
 

Knowledge

of a range of materials

of colours, patterns, textures, lines, shapes, forms and space

of a range of artists, craft makers, architects and designers

Skills

Creativity and imagination within completed artwork

Developing ideas and communicating them visually

Experimenting with ideas

Working with others to gain insight and give/receive feedback

Improving own learning – acting upon advice and feedback

Mastering techniques of painting, collage, sculpture, drawing, print, textiles, digital media

Understanding

Critical thinking, including:

  • sharing / development of ideas
  • evaluation
  • comparison

 

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

To develop ideas

Respond to ideas and starting points

Explore different methods as ideas develop.

 

For instance:

 

Work from observation and known objects

 

Use imagination to form simple images from given starting points or a description

 

 

 

Explore ideas and collect visual information.

Explore different methods and materials as ideas develop.

 

For instance:

Begin to collect idea in sketchbooks.

 

Work with different materials.

 

Begin to think what materials best suit the task.

To develop ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum.

Adapt and refine ideas as they progress.

Comment on artworks using visual language.

 

For instance:

Develop sketch books

 

Use a variety of ways to record ideas including digital cameras and iPads

 

Develop artistic/visual vocabulary to discuss work Begin to suggest improvements to own work Experiment with a wider range of materials Present work in a variety of way.

Collect information, sketches and resources to enhance own ideas.

Explore ideas in a variety of ways.

Comment on artwork with a developing grasp of visual language.

 

For instance:

Develop sketch books

 

Use a variety of ways to record ideas including digital cameras and iPads

 

Develop artistic/visual vocabulary to discuss work Begin to suggest improvements to own work Experiment with a wider range of materials Present work in a variety of ways

Develop and imaginatively extend ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum.

Collect information, sketches and resources to inspire.

Use the qualities of materials to enhance ideas.

Comment on artwork with a grasp of visual language.

For instance:

 

Select and develop ideas confidently, using suitable materials confidently

 

Improve quality of sketchbook with mixed media work and annotations

Select own images and starting points for work Develop artistic/visual vocabulary when talking

about own work and that of others

 

Begin to explore possibilities, using and combining different styles and technique.

Collect information, sketches and resources and present ideas imaginatively in a sketchbook.

Spot the potential in unexpected results as work progresses.

Comment on artworks with a fluent grasp of visual language.

For instance:

 

Select and develop ideas confidently, using suitable materials confidently

 

Improve quality of sketchbook with mixed media work and annotations

Select own images and starting points for work Develop artistic/visual vocabulary when talking

about own work and that of others

 

Begin to explore possibilities, using and combining different styles and techniques

 

 

 

To master techniques

Painting

Use thick and thin brushes.

Mix primary colours to make secondary

For instance:

Hold a large paint brush correctly

 

Make marks using paint with a variety of tools Consider consistency when applying paint

 

Recognise and name primary and secondary colours

Mix primary colours to make secondary colours

 

 

 

Add white to colours to make tints and black to make tones.

Create colour wheels.

For instance:

Share colour charts to compare variations of the

same colour

 

Create and experiment with shades of colour and name some of these

 

Recognise warm and cold colours Create washes to form backgrounds

Explore the relationship between mood and colour

 

Use a number of brush techniques using thick and thin brushes to produce shapes, textures, patterns and lines.

Mix colours effectively.

For instance:

Use a variety of brushes and experiment with ways of marking with them

Mix and match colours (create palettes to match images)

Lighten and darken tones using black and white Begin to experiment with colour to create more

abstract colour palettes (e.g. blues for leaves)

 

Use watercolour paint to produce washes for backgrounds then add detail.

Experiment with creating mood with colour.

For instance:

Mix and match colours (create palettes to match images)

Experiment with watercolour, exploring intensity of colour to develop shades

 

Explore complementary and opposing colours in creating patterns

Sketch (lightly) before painting to combine line and colour.

Create a colour palette based upon colours observed in the natural or built world.

Use the qualities of watercolour and acrylic paints to create interesting pieces.

For instance:

Build on previous work with colour by exploring intensity

 

Introduce acrylic paint

 

Develop watercolour techniques Explore using limited colour palettes

Investigate working on canvas experiment with colour in creating an effect

 

Mark make with paint (dashes, blocks of colour, strokes, points)

 

Develop fine brush strokes

Combine colours, tones and tints to enhance the mood of a piece.

Use brush techniques and the qualities of paint to create texture.

Develop a personal style of painting, drawing upon ideas from other artists.

For instance:

Build on previous work with colour by exploring intensity

 

Introduce acrylic paint

 

Develop watercolour techniques Explore using limited colour palettes

Investigate working on canvas experiment with colour in creating an effect

 

Mark make with paint (dashes, blocks of colour, strokes, points)

 

Develop fine brush strokes

Collage

Use a combination of materials that are cut, torn and glued.

For instance:

 

Develop collages, based on a simple drawing, using papers and materials

 

Collect natural materials to create a temporary collage (an autumn tree/ the school building using sticks/rocks/leaves etc.)

 

 

Sort and arrange own materials.

Mix materials to create texture.

For instance:

 

Investigate a range of textures through rubbings

Develop tearing, cutting and layering paper to create different effects

 

 

Select and arrange materials for a striking effect.

Ensure work is precise.

Use mosaics.

 

For instance:

 

Create a collage using fabric as a base

 

Ensure work is precise.

Use coiling and overlapping.

For instance:

 

Develop individual and group collages, working on a range of scales

 

Use a range of stimulus for collage work, trying to think of more abstract ways of showing views

Mix textures (rough and smooth, plain and patterned.

Use tessellation and montage.

Combine visual and tactile qualities.

Use ceramic mosaic materials and techniques.

Sculpture

Use a combination of shapes.

Include lines and texture.

Use techniques such as rolling and moulding.

 

For instance:

 

Develop understanding of 2D and 3D in terms of artwork - paintings/sculptures

 

Investigate a range of different materials and experiment with how they can be connected together to form simple structures

 

Look at sculptures and try to recreate them using everyday objects/range of materials

 

Use rolled up paper, straws, paper, card and clay as materials.

Use techniques such as cutting and carving.

For instance:

Begin to form own 3D pieces

Consider covering these with papier-ché Investigate clay - pinching, rolling, twisting,

scratching and coiling and add details and textures using tools

 

Look at sculptures by known artists and natural objects as starting points for own work

 

Create and combine shapes to create recognisable forms (e.g. shapes made from nets or solid material)

For instance:

Create work on a larger scale as a group

 

Use pipe cleaners/wire to create sculptures of human forms

 

 

Include texture that conveys feelings or movement.

Use clay and other mouldable materials.

Add materials to provide interesting detail.

For instance:

Develop confidence working with clay adding greater detail and texture

 

Add colour once clay is dried

 

Investigate ways of joining clay - scratch and slip Introduce Modroc

 

 

Show life-like qualities and real life proportions, or if more abstract, provoke different interpretations.

Use tools to carve and add shapes, texture and pattern.

For instance:

Design and create sculpture, both small and large scale

 

Make masks from a range of cultures and traditions, building a collage element into the sculptural process

 

Use objects around us to form sculptures

Combine visual and tactile qualities.

Use frameworks (such as wire moulds) to provide stability and form with Modroc.

For instance:

Use wires to create malleable forms

Build upon wire to create forms which can then be padded out (e.g. with newspaper) and covered

(e.g. with Modroc)

 

Create human forms showing movement

Drawing

Draw lines of different sizes and thickness.

Colour neatly following the lines.

For instance:

 

Make marks using paint with a variety of tools

Begin to control lines to create simple drawings from observations

 

Use thick felt tip pens/chalks/charcoal/wax crayon/ pastel

Colour within the line

 

 

Show pattern and texture by adding dots and lines.

Use charcoal to shade and contrast.

Show different tones by using coloured pencils.

For instance:

Draw on smaller and larger scales Begin to add detail to line drawings

Use different grades of pencils to show line, tone and texture.

Annotate sketches to explain and elaborate ideas.

For instance:

Use sketchbooks to record drawings from observation

 

Experiment with different tones using graded pencils

 

Include increased detail within work

Sketch lightly (no need to use a rubber to correct mistakes)

Use shading to show light and shadow.

Use hatching and cross hatching to show tone and texture.

For instance:

Draw on a range of scales

Draw using a variety of tools and surfaces (paint, chalk, pastel, pen and ink)

 

 

Develop shadows Use of tracing

Use a variety of techniques to add interesting effects (e.g. reflections, shadows, direction of sunlight)

Use a choice of techniques to depict movement, perspective, shadows and reflection.

For instance:

Use first hand observations using different viewpoints, developing more abstract representations

 

Introduce perspective, fore/back and middle ground Investigate proportions

 

Choose a style of drawing suitable for the

work (e.g. realistic, or impressionistic)

Use lines to represent movement.

Add 3D representations.

 

For instance:

Use a range of mediums on a range of backgrounds

 

Work indoors and outdoors

 

Show total qualities using cross hatching, pointillism, sidestrokes, use of rubber to draw/highlight

 

Print

Use repeating or overlapping shapes.

Mimic print from the environment (e.g. wallpapers)

For instance:

Finger print, sponge print, block print to form patterns, experiment with amounts of paint applied and develop control

 

Develop controlled printing against outline /within cut out shapes

 

Use objects to create prints (e.g. fruits, vegetables, string or sponges).

Press, roll, rub and stamp to make prints

For instance:

Use matchbox to print to explore possibilities - different sized matchboxes create different lines/ shapes/patterns

 

Experiment with marbling, investigating how ink floats and changes with movement

Use layers of two or more colours.

Replicate patterns observed in natural or built environments.

For instance:

Use roller and ink printing. Use simple block shapes formed by children

 

Blend two colours when printing

 

Make printing blocks (e.g. from coiled glued string glued to a block)

Make precise repeating patterns.

For instance:

Using roller & inks, take prints from other objects (leaves, fabric, corrugated card) to show texture make string print, create low relief prints with string on cardboard and form repeated patterns, tessellations and overlays

 

Form string roller prints to create continuous patterns

Build up layers of colours.

Create an accurate pattern showing fine detail.

For instance:

 

Create polystyrene printing blocks to use with roller and ink

Explore mono-printing(Look at the work of artists that used monoprinting include David Hockney, Tracey Emin, Picasso and Jim Dine (print)

 

Use a range of visual elements to reflect the purpose of the work.

For instance:

 

Explore Intaglio (copper etching) using thick

cardboard etched with sharp pencil point

 

Experiment with screen printing

 

Design and create motifs to be turned into printing block images

 

Investigate techniques from paper printing to work on fabrics

Textiles

Use weaving to create a pattern.

Join materials using glue and/or a stitch.

For instance:

 

Weave using recycled materials – paper, carrier bags

 

 

Use plaiting.

Use dip dye techniques.

 

For instance:

Simple batik work

 

Dye fabrics using tea, red cabbage, beetroot, onion, spinach

 

Weave with wool

 

Shape and stitch materials.

Use basic cross stitch and backstitch

For instance:

Research embroidery designs from around the world, create own designs based on these

 

Sew simple stiches using a variety of threads and wool

 

 

Colour fabric.

Create weavings.

 

For instance:

 

Investigate tie dying

 

Make felt

 

Quilt, pad and gather fabric.

Show precision in techniques.

Choose from a range of stitching techniques.

 

For instance:

Introduce fabric block printing

Create tie dye pieces combining two colours Investigate ways of changing fabrics - sewing,

ironing, cutting, tearing, creasing, knotting etc.

 

Weave using paintings as a stimulus / the natural world

 

Combine previously learned techniques to create pieces.

 

For instance:

Experiment with circular embroidery frames

 

Create detailed designs which can be developed into batik pieces

Digital media

Use a wide range of tools to create different textures and lines.

 

Use a wide range of tools to create tones, colours and shapes.

 

Create images and explain why they were created.

 

Create videos and sound recordings and explain why they were created.

 

Enhance digital media by editing (including sound and video)

 

Enhance digital media by editing (including animation, still images and installations).

 

Evaluate

 

Reflect on, analyse and critically evaluate their own work and that of others.

 

Reflect on, analyse and critically evaluate their own work and that of others.

 

Reflect on, analyse and critically evaluate their own work and that of others

 

Reflect on, analyse and critically evaluate their own work and that of others.

 

Reflect on, analyse and critically evaluate their own work and that of others.

 

Reflect on, analyse and critically evaluate their own work and that of others.

 

To take inspiration from the greats

 

Describe the work of notable artists, artisans and designers.

For instance:

 

Describe the work of artwork of artists such as Jackson Pollock, Paul Klee, Kandinsky (colour) Georges Braque/Pablo Picasso (collage)

 

Use work of artists such as Anthony Gormley, Louise Bourgeois, Jean Arp (sculpture) to create own pieces

 

Use some of the ideas of artists studied to create own pieces.

 

For instance:

Consider specific works such as Richard Longs Mud Hand Circle’ (printing)

 

Consider works from different cultures e.g. Chinese block prints

 

 

Replicate some of the techniques used by notable artists, artisans and designers.

For instance:

Use the work of artists to replicate ideas or inspire own work e.g.

 

Look at the work of David Hockney e.g. photo montages (drawing)

 

Consider the work of artists e.g. Ruth Daniels, Mark Quinn, Carol Simms (colour)

 

Look at the work of artists who formed geometric abstract paintings such as Malevich, Matisse and Mondrian

 

Create original pieces that are influenced by studies of others.

 

For instance:

Introduce work by artists such as Marc Quinn, as well as sculptures from Aztec and Benin civilizations (sculpture)

 

Consider the High Italian Renaissance period e.g. Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci etc. (drawing)

 

Look at the patterns/ optical illusions created by OP artist Bridget Riley (colour)

 

Abstract paintings by Picasso (colour)

 

Use the work of artist Stacey Chapman carand other images on the internet (print)

 

Look at work of Henry Moore (sculpture)

 

Consider work by contemporary textile artist Patricia Greaves (textiles).

Give details (including own sketches) about the style of some artists, artisans and designers.

Show how the work of those studied was influential in both society and to other artists.

For instance:

Use the work of artists to replicate ideas or inspire own work e.g.

 

Consider work by artists such as Cezanne, Derain, Van Gogh (colour)

 

Look at the style of Fauve artists Derain, Vlaminck and Braque

 

Consider the work of Seurat (pointillism colour)

 

Look at the work of artists that used monoprinting include David Hockney, Tracey Emin, Picasso and Jim Dine (print)

 

Create original pieces that show a range of influences and styles.

Apply knowledge and ideas from great artists, designers and architects from ancient to modernist periods.

For instance:

Consider work of Cornelia Parker (sculpture) Consider the work from other cultures e, g Asia Consider Georgia O Keiffe flowers showing use of

line or William Morris detailed tiles - natural sources

(colour)

 

Look at cubist artists such as Picasso, Duchamp to show movement/ layering

 

Consider looking at Pop Art to represent popular objects from current culture (Andy Warhol)

 

Artists such as Claude Lorrain, Poussin, Jan Beaney and Annemeike Mein could be discussed as starting points.

 

 

Top