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Reach for the Stars

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Pupil Premium Strategy

Arboretum Primary School

Pupil Premium Strategy 2021-22

Pupil premium strategy statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium) funding for the 2021 to 2022 academic year and the following two years, to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School overview

Detail

Data

School Name

Arboretum Primary School

Number of pupils in school

525

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

38.3%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021-2024

Date this statement was published

November 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

 November 2022

Statement authorised by

Nigel Daintith- Head

Pupil premium lead

Nigel Daintith

Governor / Trustee lead

Suzanne Forster

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£257,007

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£26,680

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

Catch-up funding 20-21 not spent: £17,937

Unspent PP from 20-21 (trips): £13,000

 

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£314,624

 

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

At Arboretum Primary School we value the abilities and achievements of all our pupils, and are committed to providing each pupil with the best possible environment for learning. We recognise that each child is unique and will have different needs, which may well vary throughout their time in the school. We have planned to spend our Pupil Premium funding to try to give them all the support that they need to “Reach for the Stars”. We believe in maximising the use of the pupil premium grant (PPG) by utilising a long-term strategy aligned to the School Improvement Plan. This enables us to implement a blend of short, medium and long-term interventions, and align pupil premium use with wider school improvements and improving readiness to learn.

Our intention is that all pupils, irrespective of their background or the challenges they face, make good progress and achieve high attainment across all subject areas. The focus of our pupil premium strategy is to support disadvantaged pupils to achieve that goal, including progress for those who are already high attainers.

We will consider the challenges faced by vulnerable pupils, such as those who have a social worker and /or additional needs. The activity we have outlined in this statement is also intended to support their needs, regardless of whether they are disadvantaged or not.

High-quality, first class teaching is at the heart of our approach, with a focus on areas in which disadvantaged pupils require the most support. This is proven to have the greatest impact on closing the disadvantage attainment gap and at the same time will benefit the non-disadvantaged pupils in our school. Implicit in the intended outcomes detailed below, is the intention that non-disadvantaged pupils’ attainment will be sustained and improved alongside progress for their disadvantaged peers.

Our strategy is also integral to wider school plans for education recovery, notably in its targeted support through intervention delivered by school staff for pupils whose education has been worst affected, including non-disadvantaged pupils.   

Our approach will be responsive to common challenges and individual needs, rooted in robust diagnostic assessment, not assumptions about the impact of disadvantage. The approaches we have adopted complement each other to help pupils excel. To ensure they are effective we will:

  • ensure disadvantaged pupils are challenged in the work that they’re set
  • act early to intervene at the point need is identified
  • adopt a whole school approach in which all staff take responsibility for disadvantaged pupils’ outcomes and raise expectations of what they can achieve

 

Challenges

Overcoming barriers to learning is at the heart of our PPG use. We understand that needs and costs will differ depending on the barriers to learning being addressed. As such, we do not automatically allocate personal budgets per pupil in receipt of the PPG. Instead, we identify the barrier to be addressed and the interventions required, whether in small groups, large groups, the whole school or as individuals, and allocate a budget accordingly.

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Assessments, observations, and discussions with pupils indicate underdeveloped oral language skills and vocabulary gaps among many disadvantaged pupils. These are evident from Nursery/Reception through to KS2 and in general, are more prevalent among our disadvantaged pupils than their peers.

2

Negative behaviour and attitudes to learning are inhibiting progress. The wellbeing of many of our disadvantaged pupils has been impacted by partial school closures to a greater extent than for other pupils. These findings are supported by national studies.

3

13.3% of pupils have identified and complex SEND. 5% of these are children with an EHCP which is above National.

4

Pupils lack independence, resilience and confidence to access learning.

5

English is often an Additional Language at home. There is often a lack of learning materials at home and a lack of parental engagement in some hard to reach families.

6

Assessments, observations and discussions with pupils demonstrate that reading attainment among disadvantaged pupils is significantly below that of non-disadvantaged pupils.

7

Assessments indicate that maths attainment among disadvantaged pupils is significantly below that of non-disadvantaged pupils.

8

Assessments, observations, and discussions with pupils suggest disadvantaged pupils generally have greater difficulties with phonics than their peers. This negatively impacts their development as readers.

9

School is located in an area of high deprivation and this often results in a lack wider experiences that our children have access to.

10

Some pupils have poor attendance for varying reasons eg health issues, which impacts upon attainment. Our attendance data over the last year indicates that attendance among disadvantaged pupils has been 1.1% lower than for non-disadvantaged pupils with persistent absence 4.7% lower.

Intended outcomes

Setting priorities is key to maximising the use of the PPG. Our priorities are as follows:

  • Ensuring an ‘outstanding’ teacher is in every class
  • Closing the attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers
  • Providing targeted academic support for pupils who are not making the expected progress
  • Addressing non-academic barriers to attainment such as attendance and behaviour
  • Ensuring that the PPG reaches the pupils who need it most

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Improved oral language skills and vocabulary among disadvantaged pupils.

Assessments and observations indicate significantly improved oral language among disadvantaged pupils. The following of our broad, balanced, challenging and enriched curriculum enables the pupils to be exposed to and learn new vocabulary. This is evident when triangulated with other sources of evidence, including engagement in lessons, book trawls and ongoing formative assessment.

Improved reading attainment among disadvantaged pupils.

KS2 reading outcomes in 2021/22 show that more than 65% of disadvantaged pupils met the expected standard.

Improved maths attainment for disadvantaged pupils at the end of KS2.

KS2 maths outcomes in 2021/22 show that more than 65% of disadvantaged pupils met the expected standard.

 

To achieve and sustain improved wellbeing for all pupils in our school, particularly our disadvantaged pupils.

Sustained high levels of wellbeing from 2021/22 demonstrated by:

  • qualitative data from student voice, student and parent surveys and teacher observations
  • a significant increase in participation in enrichment activities, particularly among disadvantaged pupils   

To achieve and sustain improved attendance for all pupils, particularly our disadvantaged pupils.

Sustained high attendance from 2021/22 demonstrated by:

  • the overall absence rate for all pupils is 4%, and the attendance gap between disadvantaged pupils and their non-disadvantaged peers being reduced by 1%.
  • the percentage of all pupils who are persistently absent will be 10% and the figure for disadvantaged pupils will be no more than 15%.

 

Activity in this academic year:

Our implementation process

We believe in selecting a small number of priorities and giving them the best chance of success. We also believe in evidence-based interventions and learning from our experiences, which is why we utilise annual light-touch reviews to ensure our approach is effective and we can cease or amend interventions that are not having the intended impact.

We will:

Explore

  • Identify a key priority that we can address
  • Systematically explore appropriate programmes and practices
  • Examine the fit and feasibility with the school

Prepare

  • Develop a clear, logical and well-specified plan
  • Assess the readiness of the school to deliver the plan
  • Make practical preparations

Deliver

  • Support staff and solve any problems using a flexible leadership approach
  • Reinforce initial training with follow-on support
  • Drive faithful adoption and intelligent adaption

Sustain

  • Plan for sustaining and scaling the intervention from the outset
  • Continually acknowledge, support and reward good implementation practices
  • Treat scale-up as a new implementation process

Our tiered approach

To prioritise spending, we have adopted a tiered approach to define our priorities and ensure balance. Our tiered approach comprises three categories:

  1. Teaching
  2. Targeted academic support
  3. Wider strategies

Within each category, we have chosen two or three interventions. This focused approach ensures the best chance of success for each intervention.

Quality of teaching

Good and Outstanding teaching is the most important lever schools have to improve outcomes for disadvantaged pupils. Using the PPG to improve teaching quality benefits all pupils and has a particularly positive effect on children eligible for Pupil Premium.

Our priority at Arboretum Primary School is to ensure that a highly effective teacher is in front of every class, and that every teacher is supported to keep improving.

Encouraging self-led professional development: Facilitating weekly CPD opportunities for all teaching staff.

  1. Professional development: Weekly individual and group coaching sessions to support teachers/TAs, with a particular emphasis on maths, literacy/vocabulary and curriculum development.
  2. Professional Development for staff by attending targeted training courses and INSET.

Targeted academic support

At Arboretum Primary School we consider carefully how staff are deployed to provide specific targeted academic support either in a one to one or small group situation.

  1. Structured interventions: Introducing speech and language interventions for pupils with poor oral language and communication skills.
  2. Small group tuition: Introducing targeted English and maths teaching for pupils who are below age-related expectations. Creating additional teaching and learning opportunities using Teachers/TAs.

 

Wider strategies

At Arboretum Primary School we aim to focus on the most significant non-academic barriers to success in school, including attendance, behaviour and social/emotional support.

  1. Readiness to learn: Continued development of a breakfast club to provide pupils with a nutritious breakfast and exercise before school.
  2. Attendance: Use of Attendance Officer and Family Liaison Officers daily to improve attendance and foster links with parents.
  3. Providing a wide variety of enrichment experiences for all pupils.

 

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £92,504

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Quality first teaching during weekly PPA in KS1 and KS2 will be facilitated by creative use of 0.6 teachers.

Phase leads and Literacy/Maths coordinators will be released weekly to monitor and develop teaching and learning. This will be facilitated by creative use of 0.6 teachers.

Improving the quality of teaching and having an ‘outstanding’ teacher in every classroom. All teaching staff are confident in the delivery and planning of the curriculum which meets the needs of all pupils, including those that are disadvantaged. This will impact upon attainment and progress for all pupils across school.

1 4 6 7 8

Embedding dialogic activities across the school curriculum. These can support pupils to articulate key ideas, consolidate understanding and extend vocabulary.

We will purchase resources and fund ongoing teacher training and release time.

There is a strong evidence base that suggests oral language interventions, including dialogic activities such as high-quality classroom discussion, are inexpensive to implement with high impacts on reading:

 

1 6

To develop speaking and listening skills across the school including a focus on greater oracy within the curriculum.

A well- structured, sequenced and progressive curriculum is in place and is used by all teaching staff.

Monitoring of lesson visits and pupil discussion evidences high quality classroom discussion takes place.

1  6

Enhancement of our maths teaching and curriculum planning in line with DfE and EEF guidance.

We will fund teacher release time to embed key elements of guidance in school through drop ins, book trawls, data analysis and team teaching to support new staff.

The DfE non-statutory guidance has been produced in conjunction with the National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics, drawing on evidence-based approaches:

The EEF guidance is based on a range of the best available evidence:

 

7  4

Maths coordinators and other senior management staff model high quality maths teaching and curriculum planning in line with the DfE and EEF guidance.

All teaching staff are confident in the delivery and planning of their maths curriculum which meets the needs of all pupils, including those that are disadvantaged. This will impact upon attainment and progress for all pupils across school.

7  4

Literacy coordinator and other senior management staff model high quality reading and writing teaching and curriculum planning in line with the DfE and EEF guidance. We will fund teacher release time to embed key elements of guidance in school through drop ins, book trawls, data analysis and team teaching to support new staff.

All teaching staff are confident in the delivery and planning of their reading and writing curriculum which meets the needs of all pupils, including those that are disadvantaged. This will impact upon attainment and progress for all pupils across school.

6  8  4

Improve the quality of social and emotional (SEL) learning.

 

SEL approaches will be embedded into routine educational practices and supported by professional development and training for staff.

There is extensive evidence associating childhood social and emotional skills with improved outcomes at school and in later life (e.g., improved academic performance, attitudes, behaviour and relationships with peers):

 

2  3  4 

All TAs will attend weekly Professional Development Meetings.

Phase leads and subject coordinators to attend high quality training courses and then disseminate to all staff

High quality and relevant

INSET to be delivered to all staff using visiting speakers

Read Write Inc training will be provided for all new staff and there will be two development days for all staff

All teaching staff are confident in the delivery and planning of their curriculum which meets the needs of all pupils, including those that are disadvantaged. This will impact upon attainment and progress for all pupils across school.

3  4  6  7  8

Laptops, tablets and charger units to be purchased for all classes across school to enhance the delivery of the curriculum and enable key ICT skills to be developed.

The use of digital technology will enhance the curriculum offer across school and provide pupils to develop their skills and apply these in a wide range of contexts and for different purposes. Addressing the digital divide for disadvantaged pupils will give them greater opportunities

3  4  5  6  7  8  9

 

 

 

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £133,959

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Improve speech, language and communication skills

 Pupils identified and targeted for weekly one to one/ small group interventions

 

Small group tuition: Introducing targeted speech and language teaching for pupils who are below age-related expectations. Creating additional teaching and learning opportunities using TAs.

1  3  4

Additional phonics sessions targeted at disadvantaged pupils who require further phonics support.

Targeted phonics interventions will take place and these are proven to be more effective when held for regular sessions over a period up to 12 weeks. Phonics approaches have a strong evidence base indicating a positive impact on pupils, particularly from disadvantaged backgrounds.

1  3  4  8

Additional TA employed to work with pupils in Y5/6 – to support learning in the classroom and to help facilitate extra tutor groups and interventions.

Tuition targeted at specific needs and knowledge gaps to support low attaining pupils or those falling behind, both one-to-one and in small groups.

TAs and other staff will be deployed to provide extra support and intervention groups for targeted pupils.

1  2  3  4  6  7  8 

To provide a blend of tuition, mentoring and school led tutoring for pupils whose education has been most impacted by the pandemic. A significant proportion of the pupils who receive tutoring will be disadvantaged, including those who are high attainers.

School led tutoring will be supported by a 25% contribution from school to enable school teachers to deliver catch up and recovery tuition across KS1 and KS2.

Tuition targeted at specific needs and knowledge gaps to support low attaining pupils or those falling behind, both one-to-one and in small groups.

TAs and other staff will be deployed to provide extra support and intervention groups for targeted pupils:

  • Talk Derby initiatives and strategies
  • Oracy project initiatives and strategies
  • Early Phonics initiatives and strategies
  • EAL family liaison and pupil support
  • RWI groups and 1:1 interventions
  • Reading and writing intervention groups

1  2  3  4  6  7  8 

                                                                                                                                                 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £90,720

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

To embed and enhance the school wide philosophy around behaviour and attitudes.

Consistent practice across the school both in and out of the classroom with behaviour and attitudes being rooted in positive comments and strong relationships.

2  4

To improve pupils’ attitudes to learning, behaviour and their concentration and resilience through Nurture/Lego therapy and other targeted strategies.

Pupils’ confidence in accessing their learning is improved. Behaviour and attitudes to learning are positive.

2  4

To enhance play opportunities for all children at lunchtimes through the purchase of a two year programme of advice, training and support from OPAL – Outdoor Play and Learning.

OPAL and the Senior Phase Lead will coordinate the organisation and enhancement of play and resources for children at lunchtime – this will have a positive impact on behaviour/attitudes and the experience of all pupils at lunchtime. Research shows that this then will positively impact on learning each day also.

2  4  9

To improve attendance for all pupils but in particular the attendance of pupils who are persistently absent through targeted strategies and support. The appointment of an Attendance Officer will enable attendance to be a key focus daily in school and for this to be monitored with rigour.

Attendance demonstrates that there is a reduction in persistent absence for these targeted groups. Attendance: Use of an Attendance Officer and Family Liaison Officers daily to improve attendance and foster links with parents.

Two members of staff deployed daily to monitor registers, make phone calls and home visits to chase up absences.

Follow up phone calls with parents to establish any underlying issues that are impacting on attendance- these are then monitored with other key staff to ensure all pupils in school are attending daily.

Paperwork completed for extended absences and children missing in education.

Regular meetings with EWO to discuss and implement strategies for persistent absentees.

Introduce a range of rewards for good attendance – individual and class.

Liaison with parents and translations – at parent meetings, start/end of the day, via phone, e-mail or in person.

To  monitor attendance daily and respond with a range of measures  to reduce absences

To develop home / school links to positively impact on attendance of all pupils

2  4  10

Contingency fund for acute issues.

 

Based on our experiences and those of similar schools to ours, we have identified a need to set a small amount of funding aside to respond quickly to needs that have not yet been identified.

1 - 10

 

To ensure equality and inclusion for all pupils to all school activities including breakfast club and school visits.

All pupils are able to access residential trips and school visits. Breakfast clubs are available to help support the attendance of pupils who are persistently absent.

Readiness to learn: Continued development of a breakfast club to provide pupils with a nutritious breakfast and exercise before school.

Kitchen staff, two sports coaches and an SEN TA will facilitate daily breakfast clubs where pupils can access healthy food and a range of activities prior to school starting.

(free to PP pupils)

All KS2 children will have daily access to free snacks at break (fruit and veg)

All pupils have equal access to a wide range of extra- curricular experiences and enrichment opportunities

An extended schools coordinator will organise and facilitate an extensive programme of clubs (free to PP) and activities during and after the school day and during holiday time.

Staff will organise a range of visits (free to PP) and visitors to enrich and enhance curricular provision.

A member of staff will be trained to deliver a forest school programme for specific targeted children.

The daily experience of a PP child in school will be enhanced through the provision of free school uniform and book bag. Access to quality books through our school library and the annual Reading Festival.

2  4  9  10

 

Total budgeted cost:   £317,183.20

 

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

How will the school measure the impact of Pupil Premium Funding?

  • FFT assessment tools are used by class teachers to measure attainment and progress at termly intervals through the year
  • All teachers are responsible for tracking the progress of all vulnerable groups, including Pupil Premium, SEND and EAL. This information is then collated and monitored by SMT.
  • Pupil Progress meetings are held between class teachers and SMT to monitor impact and identify any concerns to be addressed.
  • Attendance data is collected and monitored by the Attendance Officer/ Family Liaison Officers and SMT
  • When selecting pupils for intervention groups and support, this will not be limited to children who are in receipt of Pupil Premium funding, but will include other pupils who have similar needs, and who we believe will benefit from the support / intervention.
  • Pupil Premium funding and its impact is a regular agenda item for the School Governor’s meetings.
  • Designated staff member in charge: Nigel Daintith (Head Teacher)
  • Monitoring, assessment and tracking: Nigel Daintith and Charmian Hardy (Deputy Head), Natalie Linnecor (SENDCO)
  • Pupil Premium Responsible Governor: Lynda Wynn

 

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

Our internal assessments and FFT analysis during 2020/21 suggested that the performance of disadvantaged pupils was lower than that of Non-disadvantaged pupils in most areas of the curriculum. The gaps were not as significant in KS2 compared with KS1.See the charts below:

Key Stage One

ARE+

PP

Non-PP

Gap

R W M

34%

47%

-13%

R

38%

53%

-15%

W

47%

65%

-18%

M

66%

74%

-8%

Key Stage Two

ARE+

PP

Non-PP

Gap

R W M

34%

42%

-8%

R

59%

58%

+1%

W

41%

44%

-3%

M

59%

63%

-4%

 

Our assessment of the reasons for these outcomes points primarily to Covid-19 impact, which disrupted all our subject areas to varying degrees. As evidenced in schools across the country, school closure was most detrimental to our disadvantaged pupils, and they were not able to benefit from our pupil premium funded improvements to teaching and targeted interventions to the degree we had intended. The impact was mitigated by our resolution to maintain a high quality curriculum, including during periods of partial closure, where Class Dojo was used to provide targeted learning tasks as well as online resources and live learning opportunities.

Although overall attendance in 2020/21 was 92.11%, this was lower than the national average. At times when all pupils were expected to attend school, absence among disadvantaged pupils was 1.1% higher than their peers( PP- 91.5% v Non PP – 92.6%) and persistent absence was 4.7% higher( PP- 27.2% v Non PP – 22.5%). These gaps are larger than in previous years, which is why attendance is a focus of our current plan.    

Our assessments and observations indicated that pupil behaviour, wellbeing and mental health were significantly impacted last year, primarily due to COVID-19-related issues. The impact was particularly acute for disadvantaged pupils. We used pupil premium funding to provide wellbeing support for all pupils, and targeted interventions where required. We are building on that approach with the activities detailed in this plan.

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme

Provider

 

 

 

 

Service pupil premium funding (optional)

For schools that receive this funding, you may wish to provide the following information:

Measure

Details

How did you spend your service pupil premium allocation last academic year?

No service pupil premium funding.

What was the impact of that spending on service pupil premium eligible pupils?

 

 

 

Further information (optional)

Additional activity

Our pupil premium strategy will be supplemented by additional activity that is not being funded by pupil premium or recovery premium. That will include:

  • embedding more effective practice around feedback. EEF evidence demonstrates this has significant benefits for pupils, particularly disadvantaged pupils.
  • utilising a DfE grant to train a senior mental health lead. The training we have selected will focus on the training needs identified through the online tool: to develop our understanding of our pupils’ needs, give pupils a voice in how we address wellbeing, and support more effective collaboration with parents.
  • offering a wide range of high-quality extracurricular activities to boost wellbeing, behaviour, attendance, and aspiration. Activities will focus on building life skills such as confidence, resilience, and socialising. Disadvantaged pupils will be encouraged and supported to participate.

 

 

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