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Relationships And Health Education Policy

RELATIONSHIPS AND HEALTH EDUCATION POLICY

 

Our school is:

a safe, supportive stimulating learning environment;

a team of respectful, tolerant, open minded citizens;

a community where everyone aspires to be the very best they can be;

a community of resilient lifelong learners;

a centre of excellence where all achieve success.

 

PURPOSE

 

This policy contains information on how our school will meet its legal duties, with which schools must comply, when teaching Relationships Education and Health Education.  

 

Date issued

15th March 2021

Written By

Cluster RHE Working Party

Next Review

 

Summary of changes

 

Draft policy issued for consultation

Appendix 3 list of resources

 

Approved By:

 

Head Teacher …………………………………………….………… Date …………………………….

 

Chair of Governors …………………………………………….…. Date …………………………….

  CONTENTS

1.      Introduction  - 2 -

2.      Development of the Policy  - 2 -

3.      Consultation with parents  - 3 -

4.      Curriculum Content - 3 -

5.      Relationships Education  - 3 -

6.      Health Education  - 5 -

7.      Delivery  - 7 -

8.      Questions  - 8 -

9.      Equality and accessibility  - 8 -

10.        Sex education  - 9 -

11.        Parents’ right to withdraw   - 9 -

12.        Monitoring and review   - 10 -

Appendix 1  Consultation partners: - 11 -

Appendix 2  How Arboretum Primary School consulted parents in the development and delivery of the curriculum: - 12 -

Appendix 3: How Arboretum Primary School covers the statutory content of relationships and health education across the school’s curriculum   - 13 -

Appendix 4: Objectives taught and terminology used in the science curriculum as set out in the National Curriculum   - 13 -

 

1.Introduction

This policy has been written in accordance with the statutory guidance from the Department for Education issued under Section 80A of the Education Act 2002 and section 403 of the Education Act 1996. This policy contains information on how our school will meet its legal duties, with which schools must comply, when teaching Relationships Education and Health Education.  

The Relationships Education and Health Education (England) Regulations 2019, make Relationships Education compulsory for all pupils receiving primary education. They also make Health Education compulsory in all schools except independent schools. Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHE) continues to be compulsory in independent schools.

For the purpose of this policy, “relationships education” is defined as teaching pupils about healthy, respectful relationships, focusing on family and friendships, in all contexts, including online.

For the purpose of this policy, “health education” is defined as teaching pupils about physical health and mental wellbeing, focusing on recognising the link between the two and being able to make healthy lifestyle choices.

2.Development of the Policy

This policy has been developed by working in Partnership with schools in Derby City (See Appendix 1 for list). A core focus of this partnership was seeking and gaining the views of local religious and community groups, ensuring representation of the protected characteristics of the Equality Act 2010. 

3.Consultation with parents

The school understands the important role parents play in enhancing their children’s understanding of relationships and health. Similarly, we also understand how important parents’ views are in shaping the curriculum.

The school works closely with parents by establishing open communication – all parents are consulted in the development and delivery of the curriculum, as outlined in Appendix 2 of this policy.

Parents are provided with the following information:

  • The content of the relationships and health curriculum
  • The delivery of the relationships and health curriculum, including what is taught in each year group
  • The legalities surrounding withdrawing their child from the subjects
  • The resources that will be used to support the curriculum

 

The school aims to build positive relationships with parents by inviting them into school to discuss what will be taught, address any concerns and help parents in managing conversations with their children on the issues covered by the curriculum.

Parents will be informed termly at parent meetings and through the school website about the content of the Relationships and Heath Education taught in each year group.  Parents will be invited to discuss the content with the class teacher.  In addition, parents will be consulted in the review of the curriculum and this policy, and are encouraged to provide their views at any time.

4.Curriculum Content

Relationships and health education focusses on giving pupils the knowledge they need to make informed decisions about their wellbeing, health and relationships, and to build their self-efficacy. Health education focusses on equipping pupils with the knowledge they need to make good decisions about their own health and wellbeing.

We understand our responsibility to deliver a high-quality, age-appropriate relationship and health curriculum for all our pupils. This policy sets out the framework for our relationships and health curriculum, providing clarity on how it is informed, organised and delivered (Appendix 3). 

 

5.Relationships Education

The focus in primary school should be on teaching the fundamental building blocks and characteristics of positive relationships, with particular reference to

  • Families and people who care about me
  • Caring friendships
  • Respectful relationships
  • Online relationships
  • Being safe

 

See table below for the content laid out in the DfE Guidance:

Families

That families are important for children growing up because they can give love, security and stability

The characteristics of healthy family life, commitment to each other, including in times of difficulty, protection and care for children and other family members, the importance of spending time together and sharing each other’s lives

That others’ families, either in school or in the wider world, sometimes look different from their family, but that they should respect those differences and know that other children’s families are also characterised by love and care

That stable, caring relationships, which may be of different types, are at the heart of happy families, and are important for children’s security as they grow up

That marriage represents a formal and legally recognised commitment of two people to each other which is intended to be lifelong

How to recognise if family relationships are making them feel unhappy or unsafe, and how to seek help or advice from others if needed

 

Caring Relationships

How important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends

The characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties

That healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded

That most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right

How to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed

Respectful Relationships

The importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs

Practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships

The conventions of courtesy and manners

The importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness

That in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including those in positions of authority

About different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help

What a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive

The importance of permission-seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults

 

That people sometimes behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not

That the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-to face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous

The rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them

How to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met

How information and data is shared and used online

Being safe

What sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others (including in a digital context)

About the concept of privacy and the implications of it for both children and adults; including that it is not always right to keep secrets if they relate to being safe

That each person’s body belongs to them, and the differences between appropriate and inappropriate or unsafe physical, and other, contact

How to respond safely and appropriately to adults they may encounter (in all contexts, including online) whom they do not know

How to recognise and report feelings of being unsafe or feeling bad about any adult

How to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard

How to report concerns or abuse, and the vocabulary and confidence needed to do so

Where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources

     

 

6.Health Education

The aim of teaching pupils about physical health and mental wellbeing is to give them the information that they need to make good decisions about their own health and wellbeing. It should enable them to recognise what is normal and what is an issue in themselves and others and, when issues arise, know how to seek support as early as possible from appropriate sources.

  • Mental wellbeing
  • Internet safety and harms
  • Physical health and fitness
  • Healthy eating
  • Drugs, alcohol and tobacco
  • Health and prevention
  • Basic first aid
  • Changing adolescent body

 

See table below for the content laid out in the DfE Guidance:

Mental wellbeing

Mental wellbeing is a normal part of daily life, in the same way as physical health.

 There is a normal range of emotions (e.g. happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, nervousness) and scale of emotions that all humans experience in relation to different experiences and situations.

How to recognise and talk about their emotions, including having a varied vocabulary of words to use when talking about their own and others’ feelings.

How to judge whether what they are feeling and how they are behaving is appropriate and proportionate.

 The benefits of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation, voluntary and service-based activity on mental wellbeing and happiness.

Simple self-care techniques, including the importance of rest, time spent with friends and family and the benefits of hobbies and interests.

Isolation and loneliness can affect children and that it is very important for children to discuss their feelings with an adult and seek support.

Bullying (including cyberbullying) has a negative and often lasting impact on mental wellbeing.

Where and how to seek support (including recognising the triggers for seeking support), including whom in school they should speak to if they are worried about their own or someone else’s mental wellbeing or ability to control their emotions (including issues arising online).

It is common for people to experience mental ill health. For many people who do, the problems can be resolved if the right support is made available, especially if accessed early enough.

Internet safety and harms

For most people the internet is an integral part of life and has many benefits.

About the benefits of rationing time spent online, the risks of excessive time spent on electronic devices and the impact of positive and negative content online on their own and others’ mental and physical wellbeing.

How to consider the effect of their online actions on others and know how to recognise and display respectful behaviour online and the importance of keeping personal information private.

Why social media, some computer games and online gaming, for example, are age restricted.

The internet can also be a negative place where online abuse, trolling, bullying and harassment can take place, which can have a negative impact on mental health.

How to be a discerning consumer of information online including understanding that information, including that from search engines, is ranked, selected and targeted.

Where and how to report concerns and get support with issues online

Physical Health and Fitness

The characteristics and mental and physical benefits of an active lifestyle.

The importance of building regular exercise into daily and weekly routines and how to achieve this; for example walking or cycling to school, a daily active mile or other forms of regular, vigorous exercise.

The risks associated with an inactive lifestyle (including obesity).

How and when to seek support including which adults to speak to in school if they are worried about their health.

Healthy Eating

What constitutes a healthy diet (including understanding calories and other nutritional content).

The principles of planning and preparing a range of healthy meals.

The characteristics of a poor diet and risks associated with unhealthy eating (including, for example, obesity and tooth decay) and other behaviours (e.g. the impact of alcohol on diet or health).

Drugs alcohol and tobacco

The facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug-taking.

Health and Prevention

How to recognise early signs of physical illness, such as weight loss, or unexplained changes to the body.

About safe and unsafe exposure to the sun, and how to reduce the risk of sun damage, including skin cancer.

The importance of sufficient good quality sleep for good health and that a lack of sleep can affect weight, mood and ability to learn.

About dental health and the benefits of good oral hygiene and dental flossing, including regular check-ups at the dentist.

About personal hygiene and germs including bacteria, viruses, how they are spread and treated, and the importance of handwashing.

The facts and science relating to allergies, immunisation and vaccination.

Basic First Aid

How to make a clear and efficient call to emergency services if necessary.

Concepts of basic first-aid, for example dealing with common injuries, including head injuries.

Changing adolescent body

Key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11 including physical and emotional changes.

About menstrual wellbeing including the key facts about the menstrual cycle.

 

7.Delivery

Relationships and Health Education is taught throughout the whole school curriculum. This includes within the Personal, Social, Health Education (PSHE) curriculum, science curriculum, Physical Education (PE), computing and some aspects are included in religious education (RE). (Please see Appendix 3 for coverage of the statutory content across the school’s curriculum.)

Pupils will mainly be taught in their class groups.  Single gender lessons will be used as deemed appropriate by the school eg about the changing body. It is important to note that although separated groups may have different activities, the messages and information they receive will be consistent. It is important that children learn about all changes not just their own.

Through effective organisation and delivery of the subject, we will ensure that:

  • Core knowledge is sectioned into units of manageable size.
  • The required content is communicated to pupils clearly, in a carefully sequenced way, within a planned scheme of work.
  • Teaching includes sufficient and well-chosen opportunities and contexts for pupils to embed new knowledge so that it can be used confidently in real-life situations.

 

In addition, teachers will:

  • Deliver a high-quality and age-appropriate relationships and health curriculum in line with school and statutory requirements.
  • Use a variety of teaching methods and resources to provide an engaging curriculum that meets the needs of all pupils.
  • Ensure they do not express personal views or beliefs when delivering the programme.
  • Model positive attitudes to relationships and health education.
  • Respond to any safeguarding concerns in line with the Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy.

 

8.Questions

Teachers will attempt to answer pupils’ questions and concerns in a sensitive, age and development appropriate manner. Individual teachers will use skill and discretion in these situations and refer to the Relationships and Health Education Lead.

 

Teachers will apply the following principles:

 

  • Clear ground rules will be established and set out for each session
  • Pupil questions will be encouraged and opportunities to ask questions openly and in private eg. post it notes/question boxes will be provided
  • Clarity about the topics being taught will be shared with pupils
  • If a child’s question is not appropriate to answer in front of the class, the teacher will explain calmly that this is not part of today’s discussion and will discuss later.
  • Individual questions may be answered by the teacher at the end of the session.
  • Some questions may be referred to the child’s parents to provide an answer; in these circumstances the class teacher will make contact.

 

All staff members at the school will undergo training on a yearly basis to ensure they are up-to-date with the relationship and health education programme and associated issues.

Members of staff responsible for teaching the subjects will undergo further training led by the relationships and health education subject leader, to ensure they are fully equipped to teach the subjects effectively.

Training of staff will also be scheduled around any updated guidance on the programme and any new developments, which may need to be addressed in relation to the programme.

 

9.Equality and accessibility

The school creates a safe environment where all staff and children are respected and free to express their beliefs and opinions without fear of discrimination. The school understands its responsibilities in relation to the Equality Act 2010, specifically, that it must not unlawfully discriminate against:

    • Women/girls and men/boys
    • People of different races
    • Disabled people
    • People with different religions or beliefs or with no religion or belief
    • People of different ages
    • Lesbian, gay and bisexual and straight people
    • People who have changed their sex

 

The school is committed to making reasonable adjustments wherever possible to promote accessibility and inclusivity of the curriculum. The school understands that pupils with SEND or other needs (such as those with social, emotional or mental health needs) are entitled to learn about relationships and health education, and the programme will be designed to be inclusive of all pupils.

Teachers will understand that they may need to be more explicit and adapt their planning of work and teaching methods in order to appropriately deliver the programme to pupils with SEND or other needs.

The curriculum will be taught within the context of family life, taking care to ensure that there is no stigmatisation of children based on their home circumstances (families can include a mum and a dad, blended families (step/half siblings) single parent families, LGBT parents, families headed by grandparents, adoptive parents, foster parents/carers amongst other structures) along with reflecting sensitively that some children may have a different structure of support around them (for example: looked after children or young carers).

Provisions under the Equality Act 2010 allow our school to take positive action, where it can be evidenced to be proportionate, to respond to particular disadvantages affecting a group because of a protected characteristic. When deciding whether support is necessary to support pupils with a particular protected characteristic, we will consider our pupils’ needs, including the gender and age range of our pupils.

We will encourage children to be respectful of the differences between boys and girls, but we will also be careful of assuming that boys and girls have distinct characteristics which can lead to negative stereotyping. For example, we will discourage negative characterisation of gender such as “boys don’t cry”, or “girls shouldn’t play football” and dispel any manifestations of discrimination from an early age. In order to foster healthy and respectful peer-to-peer communication and behaviour between boys and girls, the school implements a robust Behaviour Policy, which sets out our expectations of pupils.

 

10.Sex education

All pupils must be taught the aspects of sex education outlined in the primary science curriculum – which includes teaching about the main external parts of the human body, how the human body changes as it grows from birth to old age, including puberty, and the reproductive process in some plants and animals.

The school is free to determine whether pupils should be taught sex education beyond what is required of the national curriculum. At our school, we do not teach pupils sex education beyond what is required of the science curriculum.

In line with our school’s safeguarding policy, if a child is at risk of sexual harm, additional actions will be taken to ensure children have the knowledge and skills to keep themselves and others safe.

 

11.Parents’ right to withdraw

Parents do not have the right to withdraw their children from relationships and health education or the programme of study as part of the requirements of the science curriculum. The school will continue to teach the science curriculum as set out in the National Curriculum (see Appendix 4 for objectives taught and terminology used). The changing of the adolescent body topics will be taught in single sex groups and, where possible, by a member of staff of the same gender.

 

12. Monitoring and review

This policy will be reviewed on an annual basis by the relationships and health education subject lead, Head Teacher and governors. The next scheduled review date for this policy is July 2021.

This policy will also be reviewed in light of any changes to statutory guidance, feedback from parents, staff or pupils, and issues in the school or local area that may need addressing.

The governing board is responsible for approving this policy.

Any changes made to this policy will be communicated to all staff and parents by the school website.

 

Appendix 1  Consultation partners:

Akaal Primary School

Arboretum Primary School

Dale Primary School

Firs Primary School

Hardwick Primary School

PearTree Infant and Walbrook Nursery School

Pear Tree Junior School

Shelton Infant School

St Chad’s Church of England Nursery and Infant School

St James’ Church of England Infant and Nursery School

St James’ Church of England Junior School

Zaytouna Primary School

Derby City Council Education Officer

 

Representatives from:

  • The Muslim faith
  • The Sikh faith
  • Church of England
  • Methodist
  • Virtual School
  • Derbyshire LGBT+

 

Appendix 2  How Arboretum Primary School consulted parents in the development and delivery of the curriculum:

Our school understands the important role parents play in enhancing their children’s understanding of relationships and health. Parents’ views are important in shaping the curriculum.

Our school works closely with parents by establishing open communication – all parents are consulted in the development and delivery of the curriculum through meetings, letters and surveys.

Parents are provided with the following information:

  • The content of the relationships and health curriculum
  • The delivery of the relationships and health curriculum, including what is taught in each year group
  • The legalities surrounding withdrawing their child from the subjects
  • The resources that will be used to support the curriculum

 

Our school aims to build positive relationships with parents and we invite them into school to discuss what will be taught, address any concerns and help parents in managing conversations with their children on the issues covered by the curriculum.

Parents are encouraged to provide their views at any time.

 

Appendix 3:  Derby Inner City Cluster Relationships and Health Education Statutory Content & Shared Resources

Families

Statutory Content

 

  • That families are important for children growing up because they can give love, security and stability
  • The characteristics of healthy family life, commitment to each other, including in times of difficulty, protection and care for children and other family members, the importance of spending time together and sharing each other’s lives
  • That others’ families, either in school or in the wider world, sometimes look different from their family, but that they should respect those differences and know that other children’s families are also characterised by love and care
  • That stable, caring relationships, which may be of different types, are at the heart of happy families, and are important for children’s security as they grow up
  • That marriage represents a formal and legally recognised commitment of two people to each other which is intended to be lifelong
  • How to recognise if family relationships are making them feel unhappy or unsafe, and how to seek help or advice from others if needed

EYFS (Not Statutory)

My Mum/ My Dad – Anthony Browne

Owl Babies – Martin Waddell

Monkey Puzzle – Julia Donaldson

Peace at last – Jill Murphy

Stick Man – Julia Donaldson

Children to share photos of their family members

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

Family Book – Todd Parr

Same, Same but different by Jenny Sue Kosteci-Shaw

Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney

The great big book of families by Mark Hoffman and Ros Asquith

One family by George Shannon

The smeds and the smoos by Julia Donaldson

Families, families, families! By Suzanne Lang and Max Lang

Create a family portrait

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Introducing Yasmin and Tom, Different families

Cambridgeshire Primary Personal Development Scheme

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

Family Poster  by Elise Gravel

Create a family tree Activity

Gorilla by Anthony Browne

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Gender stereotypes/Celebrating differences

 

Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

Family Poster  by Elise Gravel

A range of images of diverse adult couples (Google Search)

Explore reasons why people get married

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Gender stereotypes/ Discrimination and Equal Opportunities

 

Caring Relationships

Statutory Content

Year Groups

  • How important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends
  • The characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties
  • That healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded
  • That most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right
  • How to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed

EYFS (Not Statutory)

Bob’s blue period – Marion Denchars

The Gingerbread Man

Feelings fans- happy, sad, lonely.

Circle games- pass a smile, roll a ball to someone and say their name- ensuring everyone in the circle has a turn

BBC Friendship Video

Trust- Little Red Riding Hood and the Big Bad Wolf

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

BBC Video where two children discuss their friendships-

Children’s discussions about their own friendships.

Creating own class resource- What makes a good friend- list ingredients. BBC Video to start

Circle games e.g ‘The Space on my right is free, I would like ____ to sit next to me’ (ensuring everyone gets a turn). ‘I think a friend is someone who…’

SEAL Peaceful Problem Solving Poster and Feelings Detective Poster

Trust- The Gingerbread Man (Who should not have been trusted?)

Discussion- Who can you go to in school if you are experiencing problems with friendships?

Perfectly Norman by Tom Percival

Julian loves mermaids by Jessica Love

Giving advice on how to be a caring friend.

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Friends

Cambridgeshire Primary Personal development Scheme: Family and Friends/Anti Bullying

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

THE BFG- Sophie’s friendship with the giant (trust).

Creating a recipe for a friend using a bank of words (ingredients and method).

Problem solving scenarios e.g. SEAL resources BBC  Starting point video-

SEAL Peaceful Problem Solving Poster and Feelings Detective Poster

Trust- The Fox and the Crow (Aesop’s Fable)

Discussion- Who can you go to in school if you are experiencing problems with friendships?

Morris Micklewhite & The Tangerine Dress by Christine Baldaccino

The squirrels who squabbled by Rachel Bright

Cambridgeshire Primary Personal development Scheme: Family and Friends/Anti Bullying

Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

Class discussion on appropriate relationships between children in year 5 & 6?

Problem solving scenarios – could include drama

Trust- Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing (Aesop’s Fable)

Discussion- Who can you go to in school if you are experiencing problems with friendships

Given scenarios – caring or not caring and why?

Sleepovers by Jacqueline Wilson

Cambridgeshire Primary Personal development Scheme: Family and Friends/Anti Bullying

 

Respectful Relationships

Statutory Content

 

  • Practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships
  • The conventions of courtesy and manners
  • The importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness
  • That in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including those in positions of authority
  • About different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help
  • What a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive
  • The importance of permission-seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults

EYFS (Not Statutory)

The Rainbow fish – Marcus Pfister

Tidy Titch – Pat Hutchins

Learning the names of our new friends

Respecting one another and the classroom provision

Using manners at lunchtime and around school

Anti-Bullying Alliance- Resources for Anti-Bullying Week

Ways to Look after yourself- washing hands, eating your lunch and doing things that make you happy

Permission seeking – rules for playing games, asking adults for permission e.g. to go out of the classroom and why it is important (fire, safety)

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

Same similar different activity (p66 PSHE Matters)

 ‘It’s okay to be different’ Todd Parr

Elmer

Rainbow Fish

Anti-Bullying Alliance- Resources for Anti-Bullying Week

Thought shower for classroom – What are good manners?

Stereotypes- Amazing Grace stories by Mary Hoffman

Respecting Ourselves- How do we do it? Explore question in groups.

Permission seeking- rules for playing games and asking people what they are ‘comfortable’ with- link to being assertive and being able to say ‘no’ with confidence)- asking adults for permission and the possible consequences of not doing so.

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Gender stereotypes/Celebrating difference: Similar and different.

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

Elmer

Rainbow Fish

Anti-Bullying Alliance- Resources for Anti-Bullying Week

Stereotypes- matching descriptions of people to jobs and discussing choices.

Respecting ourselves- Make posters to encourage people to respect themselves and others.

Permission seeking- rules for co-operation and asking people what they are ‘comfortable’ with- link to being assertive and being able to say ‘no’ with confidence- scenarios with ‘Should you ask for permission?’

SEAL- Be Assertive Poster

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: What makes a good friend? / Getting on with your family.

Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

The Linking Network and Identity pack and resources

Explore language around protected characteristics such as lesbian, gay, heterosexual, transgendered, disability, race, religion, culture, gender,

Wonder –R.J Palcio (Resource Pack)

Anti-Bullying Alliance- Resources for Anti-Bullying Week

Creating poems about respecting themselves and others.

Explore quotes about respect- Which one is your favourite and why?

Permission seeking- Why is important to ask people for permission if it something that involves them? Discuss and link to technology!

Stereotypes- exploring different types of stereotypes and the effects they can have on people

SEAL- Be Assertive Poster

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Relationships: Trust/ Peer Pressure

 

Online Relationships

Statutory Content

Year Groups

  • The importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs
  • That people sometimes behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not
  • That the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-to face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous
  • The rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them
  • How to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met
  • How information and data is shared and used online

EYFS (Not Statutory)

Pumpkin Soup – Helen Cooper

The Rainbow fish – Marcus Pfister

Project evolve toolkit www.projectevolve.co.uk/toolkit

Think u know www.thinkuknow.co.uk

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents/jessie-and-friends-videos/ 4-5

(video about watching videos)

Safer Internet Day- annually resources

 

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

Project evolve toolkit www.projectevolve.co.uk/toolkit

Think u know www.thinkuknow.co.uk

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents/jessie-and-friends-videos/ 5-6

(video about sharing pictures)

Safer Internet Day- annually resources

Chicken Clickin by Jeanne Willis

Own it: Making the internet a kinder place video

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Online technology safety: Taking care online – personal details/ Who can help us

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

Project evolve toolkit www.projectevolve.co.uk/toolkit

Think u know www.thinkuknow.co.uk

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents/jessie-and-friends-videos/6-7

(video about watching playing games)

Safer Internet Day- annually resources

Chicken Clickin by Jeanne Willis

Own it: Making the internet a kinder place video

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Online technology safety: Taking care online – personal details/ Who can help us?

https://www.fpa.org.uk/relationships-and-sex-education/growing-up-with-yasmine-and-tom

Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

Project evolve toolkit www.projectevolve.co.uk/toolkit

Think u know www.thinkuknow.co.uk

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents/jessie-and-friends-videos/

Children to watch all videos- What is the message from each video and why is it important? How effective do you think the videos are?

Safer Internet Day- annually resources

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Online technology safety: Social networking and sending pictures/ Cyberbullying

 

 

 

 

Being Safe

Statutory Content

 

  • What sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others (including in a digital context)
  • About the concept of privacy and the implications of it for both children and adults; including that it is not always right to keep secrets if they relate to being safe
  • That each person’s body belongs to them, and the differences between appropriate and inappropriate or unsafe physical, and other, contact
  • How to respond safely and appropriately to adults they may encounter (in all contexts, including online) whom they do not know
  • How to recognise and report feelings of being unsafe or feeling bad about any adult
  • How to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard
  • How to report concerns or abuse, and the vocabulary and confidence needed to do so
  • Where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources

 

EYFS (Not Statutory)

Bog baby – Jeanne Willis

What is a secret? Discussion

Privacy- Using the toilets

Little Red Riding Hood

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

Counting Kisses by Karen Katz

NSPCC – PANTS

What is a secret? Discussion and should we keep secrets?

Privacy- Using the toilets

Discussion about who to go to in school for advice help- links with Anti-Bullying Week- see Anti-Bullying Alliance resources

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Keeping safe -  in the house/ out and about/ People who can help me.

Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

NSPCC – PANTS

What is a secret? Discussion and should we keep secrets?

Privacy- Using the toilets, getting changed

Discussion about who to go to in school for advice help- links with Anti-Bullying Week- see Anti-Bullying Alliance resources

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Keeping safe -  in the house/ out and about/ People who can help me.

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

NSPCC – PANTS

What is a secret? Discussion

Privacy- Using the toilets, getting changed, respecting people’s privacy

Discussion about who to go to in school for advice help- links with Anti-Bullying Week- see Anti-Bullying Alliance resources

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Keeping safe: Assertiveness/ Saying no/ Good and bad touch/ People who can help me

 

Changing adolescent body

Statutory Content

 

  • Key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11 including physical and emotional changes.
  • About menstrual wellbeing including the key facts about the menstrual cycle.
  • identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense.
  • describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird
  • describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals.
  • describe the changes as humans develop to old age.
  • notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults

EYFS (Not Statutory)

The very hungry caterpillar – Eric Carle

Bog baby – Jeanne Willis

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

Boys and Girls by Lynwen Jones (year 2)

*key list of vocabulary

BBC lifecycles – Bitesize  https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z6882hv/articles/zttckqt

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Life cycles: Different ages/Looking after babies.

 

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

Boys and Girls by Lynwen Jones

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Life cycles: Growing up and getting older/ Me, myself and I.

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: My body: Parts of the body/ Keeping clean

Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

Split into same sex grouping and delivered by a teacher of the same gender were possible – resources to be shared yearly prior to teaching

Split into same sex grouping and delivered by a teacher of the same gender were possible – resources to be shared yearly prior to teaching

BBC lifecycles – Bitesize

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: My body Puberty/periods

Living and Growing.

 

 

Mental Wellbeing

Statutory Content

 

  • that mental wellbeing is a normal part of daily life, in the same way as physical health.
  • that there is a normal range of emotions (e.g. happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, nervousness) and scale of emotions that all humans experience in relation to different experiences and situations.
  • how to recognise and talk about their emotions, including having a varied vocabulary of words to use when talking about their own and others’ feelings.
  • how to judge whether what they are feeling and how they are behaving is appropriate and proportionate.
  • the benefits of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation, voluntary and service-based activity on mental wellbeing and happiness.
  • simple self-care techniques, including the importance of rest, time spent with friends and family and the benefits of hobbies and interests.
  • isolation and loneliness can affect children and that it is very important for children to discuss their feelings with an adult and seek support.
  • that bullying (including cyberbullying) has a negative and often lasting impact on mental wellbeing.
  • where and how to seek support (including recognising the triggers for seeking support), including whom in school they should speak to if they are worried about their own or someone else’s mental wellbeing or ability to control their emotions (including issues arising online).
  • it is common for people to experience mental ill health. For many people who do, the problems can be resolved if the right support is made available, especially if accessed early enough.

EYFS (Not Statutory)

Feelings Fans- naming feelings

SEAL Photo cards-identifying feelings

Children’s Mental Health Week Resources

Anti-Bullying Week Resources

Go Noodle Mindfulness and exercise activities

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

Feelings Fans- naming feelings

SEAL Photo cards-identifying feelings

Children’s Mental Health Week Resources

Anti-Bullying Week Resources

Go Noodle Mindfulness and exercise activities

SEAL Feelings Detective Posters

What is a hobby?-Circle time- ‘My hobby is…’

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Feelings  -Different emotions/What do we do when we feel sad.

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

Feelings Fans- naming feelings

SEAL Photo cards-identifying feelings

Children’s Mental Health Week Resources- https://www.childrensmentalhealthweek.org.uk/

Anti-Bullying Week Resources- https://www.anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk/

Mindfulness and exercise activities- https://www.gonoodle.com/

SEAL Feelings Detective Posters

Hobbies- Drawing a hobby they have and a hobby they would like to take up

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Feelings – Expressing our feelings/ Managing our feelings

Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

Children’s Mental Health Week Resources

Anti-Bullying Week Resources

Go Noodle Mindfulness and exercise activities

SEAL Feelings Detective Posters

Hobbies- What hobbies do you have now and what hobbies do you see yourself having when you are older? How does following a hobby affect our health? Discussion.

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Feelings – Expressing our feelings/ Managing our feelings.

 

 

Internet Safety and Harm

Statutory Content

 

  • that for most people the internet is an integral part of life and has many benefits.
  • about the benefits of rationing time spent online, the risks of excessive time spent on electronic devices and the impact of positive and negative content online on their own and others’ mental and physical wellbeing.
  • how to consider the effect of their online actions on others and know how to recognise and display respectful behaviour online and the importance of keeping personal information private.
  • why social media, some computer games and online gaming, for example, are age restricted.
  • that the internet can also be a negative place where online abuse, trolling, bullying and harassment can take place, which can have a negative impact on mental health.
  • how to be a discerning consumer of information online including understanding that information, including that from search engines, is ranked, selected and targeted.
  • where and how to report concerns and get support with issues online.

EYFS (Not Statutory)

Links to Anti-Bullying Week, Child Mental Health Week and Safer Internet Day

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/

 

 

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

Links to Anti-Bullying Week, Child Mental Health Week and Safer Internet Day

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Online technology safety: Taking care online – personal details/ Who can help us?

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

Links to Anti-Bullying Week, Child Mental Health Week and Safer Internet Day

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: Online technology safety: Taking care online – personal details/ Who can help us?

 Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

Links to Anti-Bullying Week, Child Mental Health Week and Safer Internet Day

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/

 

 

Physical Health and Fitness

 

Statutory Content

 

  • the characteristics and mental and physical benefits of an active lifestyle.
  • the importance of building regular exercise into daily and weekly routines and how to achieve this; for example walking or cycling to school, a daily active mile or other forms of regular, vigorous exercise.
  • the risks associated with an inactive lifestyle (including obesity).
  • how and when to seek support including which adults to speak to in school if they are worried about their health.

EYFS (Not Statutory)

  • Take 10 in classrooms
  • Joe Wicks Routines
  • Links during Child Mental Health Week

 

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

  • Take 10 in classrooms
  • Joe Wicks Routines
  • Links during Child Mental Health Week
  • Discussion about who they can go to if they are concerned about their health

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: My body external body parts/ Internal body parts

 

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

-Take 10 in classrooms

-Joe Wicks Routines

-Links during Child Mental Health Week

-Discussion about who they can go to if they are concerned about their health

Cambridgeshire Primary Personal Development scheme: Healthy lifestyles.

 

 Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

-Take 10 in classrooms

- Joe Wicks Routines

- Links during Child Mental Health Week

- Discussion about who they can go to if they are concerned about their health

Cambridgeshire Primary Personal Development scheme: My emotions.

 

Healthy Eating

Statutory Content

 

  • what constitutes a healthy diet (including understanding calories and other nutritional content).
  • the principles of planning and preparing a range of healthy meals.
  • the characteristics of a poor diet and risks associated with unhealthy eating (including, for example, obesity and tooth decay) and other behaviours (e.g. the impact of alcohol on diet or health).

EYFS (Not Statutory)

Food- https://www.nhs.uk/change4life

Healthy Eating Resources

 

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

 Food- https://www.nhs.uk/change4life

Healthy Eating Resources

Healthy and Unhealthy- sorting pictures of foods

Teeth and sugar- coke experiment

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

Food- https://www.nhs.uk/change4life

Food Pyramid

Healthy and Unhealthy- sorting pictures of meals and explaining why

Healthy Eating Resources

Teeth and diet- facts. Investigation- Which drink contains the most sugar?

Cambridgeshire Primary Personal Development scheme: Healthy lifestyles.

 

Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

Food- https://www.nhs.uk/change4life

Food Wheel

Healthy Eating Resources

Healthy Eating- nutritional content of food and traffic light system (food packaging)

Investigation- Which food contains the most calories?

 

Health and Prevention

Statutory Content

 

  • how to recognise early signs of physical illness, such as weight loss, or unexplained changes to the body.
  • about safe and unsafe exposure to the sun, and how to reduce the risk of sun damage, including skin cancer.
  • the importance of sufficient good quality sleep for good health and that a lack of sleep can affect weight, mood and ability to learn.
  • about dental health and the benefits of good oral hygiene and dental flossing, including regular check-ups at the dentist.
  • about personal hygiene and germs including bacteria, viruses, how they are spread and treated, and the importance of handwashing.
  • the facts and science relating to allergies, immunisation and vaccination.

EYFS (Not Statutory)

Sun Safe resources

Teeth Resources

 

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

Sun Safe resources

Teeth Resources

 

Cambridgeshire Primary Personal Development scheme: Healthy lifestyles.

Growing up with Yasmin and Tom: My body keeping clean.

 

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

Sun Safe resources

Teeth Resources

 

Cambridgeshire Primary Personal Development scheme: Personal safety/ Managing risk

 

 Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

Sun Safe resources

Teeth Resources

 

Cambridgeshire Primary Personal Development scheme: Personal safety/ Managing risk

 

 

Basic First Aid

Statutory Content

 

  • how to make a clear and efficient call to emergency services if necessary.
  • concepts of basic first-aid, for example dealing with common injuries, including head injuries.

EYFS (Not Statutory)

Who to go to in school if you hurt yourself.

 

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

Who to go to in school if you hurt yourself.

Calling 999 in an emergency.

Red Cross Life Live it: Stay safe

 

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

Who to go to in school if you hurt yourself.

Calling 999 in an emergency.

Red Cross Life Live it: Stay safe

 

 Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

Who to go to in school if you hurt yourself.

Calling 999 in an emergency.

Red Cross Life Live it: Stay safe

 

Life Processes of reproduction

Statutory Content

 

  • Describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals /describe the changes as humans develop to old age
  • recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents

 

EYFS (Not Statutory)

The very hungry caterpillar – Eric Carle

Observing changes in animals – caterpillars, chicks, tadpoles

 

Key Stage One (Y1&2)

 Matching pictures of baby animals to adults.

Lower Key Stage 2 (Y3&4)

Human lifecycle- ordering pictures form baby to elderly person.

 Upper Key Stage 2 (Y5&6)

Pictures of when they were babies and now- Guess Who?

Matching pictures of teachers when they were children to pictures now.

 

Appendix 4: Objectives taught and terminology used in the science curriculum as set out in the National Curriculum

Year 1:

 

Notes and guidance (non-statutory)

Pupils should use the local environment throughout the year to explore and answer questions about animals in their habitat. They should understand how to take care of animals taken from their local environment and the need to return them safely after study. Pupils should become familiar with the common names of some fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, including those that are kept as pets.

Pupils should have plenty of opportunities to learn the names of the main body parts (including head, neck, arms, elbows, legs, knees, face, ears, eyes, hair, mouth, teeth) through games, actions, songs and rhymes.

Pupils might work scientifically by: using their observations to compare and contrast animals at first hand or through videos and photographs, describing how they identify and group them; grouping animals according to what they eat; and using their senses to compare different textures, sounds and smells.

 

Year 2:

 

 

Year 3 and Year 4 – nothing linked

 

Year 5:

Year 6:

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